Images of Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park

Key Facts

The National Park encompasses around 720 sq miles (1,865 sq km) of some of the finest scenery in Scotland and is split into four distinct areas.
 
It is a place of contrasts from rolling lowland landscapes in the south to high mountains in the north, and has many lochs and rivers, forests and woodlands. It is also a living, working landscape which has been influenced by people for generations and is visited and enjoyed by many for its recreational value.


The Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park became fully operational on 19 July 2002 and was officially opened by Princess Anne on 24 July 2002.

Key Facts

  • The Park is 1,865 sq km (720 sq miles) and has a boundary length of 350km (220miles).
  • 50% of Scotland’s population lives within an hour’s drive of the National Park.
  • There are 21 Munros (mountains above 3,000ft) in the Park and the highest is Ben More at 1,174m.
  • There are 19 Corbetts (mountains between 2,500ft and 3,000ft).
  • There are 22 larger lochs, with numerous smaller lochs and lochans.
  • About 50 rivers and large burns.
  • 15,600 people live in the National Park (2001 census).
  • There are two Forest Parks – Queen Elizabeth in the Trossachs and Argyll in Cowal.
  • Ben Lomond National Memorial Park is Scotland’s national memorial to those who have died in conflict. Find out more at www.nts.org.uk