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Dundurn – St. Fillans Hill

The rocky knoll of Dundurn might only be 112m high but it packs in a great deal of interest, both historic and scenic.

A short walk to the summit starts from the village of St. Fillans at a stone bridge over the River Earn, at the eastern end of Loch Earn.

A path is easy to find and is only steep for a short ascent of the actual knoll. En route to the top you can visit a burial ground and the remains of St. Fillan’s Chapel, dating back to the 1300s.

At the flat hilltop there was once a Pictish Fort, although little can be seen today. A stone to the west side of the summit is known as St Fillan’s Seat. The hilltop is a Scheduled Ancient Monument in recognition of its national importance and its past use as a site of great religious significance to both Christians and Picts.

Return on the same path to avoid sheer rocks on most sides of the hill.

For more information about the trail up Dundurn click here.

View from the top towards west

View from the top towards east

Before you go…

You’ll often find yourself in locations such as working farms, estates and areas protected for their conservation value, and we hope all our visitors will act responsibly and respect their surroundings, while having a safe and enjoyable time in the National Park.

  • Always ensure you are prepared; information and practical advice on how to stay safe can be found by reading about Safety and skills in the mountains from Mountaineering Scotland and on our ‘Respect Your Park & stay safe‘ page.
  • Be aware that the owners of the land you are crossing might be engaged in deer management and other farming activities and you can help minimise the chance of disturbance. Read more about it in the Heading to the Hills practical guide.

Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park Authority cannot be held responsible for any accidents, injuries or damage sustained whilst hiking in the Park. All persons taking part in such activities do so at their own risk, acknowledging and accepting the risk of accident, injury or damage.

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