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aerial-view-of-loch-lomond-on-sunny-day-with-maid-of-the-loch-steamship-and-ben-lomond-visible-in-the-distance

Islands of Loch Lomond

All the islands on Loch Lomond have names coined originally in Gaelic, with the oldest names carrying the element ‘innis’ meaning island, anglicised ‘inch’. A minority carry the element ‘eilean’, the modern standard Gaelic word for ‘island’.

 

Island names

Bucinch: Boc Innis (BOCHK inish) – ‘buck (goat) island’

Ceardach: An Ceàrdach (un KYARDuch) – ‘smiddy’ (possibly used for metalworking)

Clairinch: Clàr Innis (KLAAR inish) – ‘flat island’

Creinch: Craobh Innis (KROEUV inish) – ‘tree island’ (it presumably remained wooded when other islands had been cleared)

Island I Vow: Eilean a’ Bhùth (aylan uh VOO) – ‘island of the booth/hut’

Ellanderroch: Eilean Darach (aylan DARuch) – ‘island of oaks’

Fraoch Island: Fraoch Eilean (FROEUCH aylan) – ‘heather island’

Inchcailloch: Innis Chailleach (inish CHEYLyuch) – ‘island of nuns’ (said to be the site of St Kentigerna’s nunnery)

Inchconnachan: Innis Chonachain (inish CHONuchin)  – the meaning is unclear; explained locally as ‘Colquhoun’s isle’, it was long in the possession of the Colquhouns of Luss

Inchcruin: An Innis Chruinn (un inish CHRUHeen) – ‘the round island’, probably named for a rounded peninsula on its eastern side

Inchfad: An Innis Fhada (un inish ATuh) –  ‘the long island’

Inchlonaig: Innis Lònaig (inish LÒNik)  – probably ‘island of the small marsh’; famous for its yew trees reputedly planted by King Robert the Bruce

Inchmoan: Innis Mòna (inish MÒNuh)  – ‘peat island’ long used by the inhabitants of Luss as a source of fuel

Inchmurrin: Innis Mearain (inish MERin) – ‘St Mirren’s island’

Inchtavannach: Innis Taigh a’ Mhanaich (inish tey uh VANich) – ‘the island of the monk’s house’ (connected with St Kessog and once the site of a monastery)

Tarbet Isle: Eilean an Tairbeirt(aylan un TARubirtch) – ‘the island of the isthmus or portage’

Islands_map_large
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