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Waterfalls

Gaelic has several words for a waterfall, the most common being eas (ESS). Waterfalls and fast running water were given special status in Gaelic tradition, often being the haunts of supernatural creatures, although evil spirits were said not to be able to cross running water.

There are many fine waterfalls in the Park; the following are some of the best known.

Inversnaid Waterfall

Grid reference: 233768 / 708805

Gaelic: Eas Inbhir Snàthaid (inivur SNAA-itch), meaning ‘The mouth of Allt na Snàthaid’ (the needle like stream).

Easy access, short distance south of the Hotel. Path leads down to a bridge over a peaceful pool with waterfall cascading over The Arklet Burn, as it falls into Loch Lomond . Gerald Manley Hopkins 1844–1889 whose posthumous 20th century fame established him among the leading Victorian poets, wrote of the falls in his poem Inversnaid:“What would the world be, once bereft Of wet and of wildness? Let them be left, O let them be left, wildness and wet; Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.”

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Falls of Leny

Grid reference: 259136 / 708713

Gaelic: Eas Lànaigh (LAANee). Meaning obscure. The Pass of Leny is Cumhang Lànaigh (koo-unk LAANee). The river is the well-named Garbh Uisge (garav OOSHkuh) ‘boisterous river’.

Best view from National Cycle Route 7, a good walk from Callander or shorter walk from Ben Ledi car park (popular car park, get there early!) or car park at Kilmahog which has link path to the NCR7. Popular with (competent and experienced) canoeists. Spectacular, especially after heavy rain.

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Falls of Dochart

Grid reference: 257149 / 732484

Gaelic: Eas Dochart (DOCHart). Reputedly ‘the scourer’ (with negative connotations, referring to this impressive feature by Killin).

Very easy access. Be careful of traffic if viewing from the bridge. When water level is lower it’s very easy to scramble out onto dry ledges and boulders, but take care as they may be slippery. The River Dochart widens just before Killin and at same time the gradient steepens resulting in the Falls. Passing under the bridge water cascades down over the rocks and around the island of Inchbuie, which is the traditional burial place of the McNab Clan.

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Little Fawn Waterfall

Grid reference: 252153 / 701702

Very accessible, car parking at The Lodge, near Aberfoyle. The Little Fawn Waterfall is an impressive double waterfall in wooded setting not far from the Lodge. The waterfalls trail is a relaxing short trail which can be extended on to other forest and hill walks.

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Sruth Ban Waterfalls

Grid reference: 216540 / 699454

Gaelic: An Sruth Bàn (un stroo BAAN), meaning ‘The fair torrent’ (the falls appear white against the dark rock).

Best experienced as part of a fine walk, Strachur to Lochgoilhead, a section of the Cowal Way. A public transport trip can be undertaken on Monday to Fridays, taking the 10:20 West Coast Motors route 484, Dunoon to Strachur arriving 10:55. Walk over to Lochgoilhead for the return 15:11 service back to Dunoon. Shops and hotels at both ends of the walk.

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Waterfalls above Inverarnan, Beinglas Waterfall

Waterfalls above Inverarnan, Beinglas Waterfall

Grid reference: 232213 / 718661

Gaelic: A’ Bheinn Ghlas. The name derives from the adjacent mountain Ben Glas, properly A’ Bheinn Ghlas (uh vayn GHLAS) ‘the green mountain’. In Gaelic, the feature is Eas na Beinne Glaise (nuh baynyuh GLASHuh).

Seen on route up to Beinn Chabhair, but worth a closer look than the view from the road. Start walk from the Drover’s Inn and follow path around the farm.

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Falls of Falloch

Grid reference: 257149 / 732484

Gaelic: Eas Falach  (FALuch), meaning from the glen.

Short walk from car park on A82. A nice spot for a picnic, just a short walk from the A82 so can be incorporated as a break in a journey. An impressive piece of river for canoeists.

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Bracklinn Falls

Grid reference: 264535 / 708442

Gaelic: A’ Bhreac Linn (uh VREH-uchk leen), meaning ‘Dappled pool’.

Walk from Callander or avoid some of the steepness by driving to the Falls car park. A new Bracklinn Falls bridge, rebuilt in a community project, was opened in November 2010. Original bridge swept away in flash floods in 2004. Bracklinn Falls were a popular attraction in Victorian times and the stunning new bridge allows you to cross the dramatic gorge and see the falls face on. There are gentle woodland walks around the falls.

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White Bridge Falls

Grid reference: 233972 / 728970

Between Crianlarich and Tyndrum. Park up and it’s a short walk from the A82.

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