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Case studies

Here are some examples of funded projects from the previous years.

Fish in the Park Project – Forth Rivers Trust

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Young anglers

Last year, £1600 was awarded to the Forth Rivers Trust for the Fish in the Park project.

The project introduced four young people to angling and rivercraft, encouraging them to learn about fish and invertebrate identification, methods of angling and safe use of the water environment.

This project provided an opportunity to participate in three guided sessions to learn angling skills and rivercraft, covering a variety of topics including:

  • Fishing opportunities
  • Fish identification
  • Health & Safety around the water environment
  • Casting
  • Knot tying
  • Kick sampling for invertebrates and river fly identification

The funding paid for the purchase of fishing equipment which was used by the young people on the course during the sessions. The kits are also be available to borrow by the young people to allow them to continue to fish and take up the sport. Other young people who fish but do not have their own equipment will also be allowed to book the equipment, encouraging others into the sport.

Callander Primary School – Nursery Garden

In 2019, a grant of £3653 was awarded to Callander Primary School Nursery for resources to encourage wildlife and interest and engage the children in the garden.

The project aimed to provide an engaging and exciting outdoor area for children to explore and discover. Through growing their own plants, vegetables and fruit the children will also develop important life skills such as responsibility and confidence whilst learning about sustainability and healthy eating. It follows that they will develop a love for the outdoors, nature and for the National Park.

The resources purchased with the grant scheme funds included wooden planters for wildflowers and vegetables, a bug hotel, an outdoor kitchen and an outdoor shelter for wet weather. The grant also enabled equipment to be sourced to explore nature close up, such as bug boxes and magnifiers. With contributions such as plants and other equipment from the local community, the garden will provide a safe and engaging outdoor space for children and develop interests and skills which they will take through to adulthood.

‘The resources have allowed the children to gain an understanding of nature.’

A spokesperson from the nursery commented: ‘The children benefit greatly from the range of resources we were able to purchase due to the grant we secured from the National Park Grant Scheme. We appreciate that for some learners being outdoors at nursery may be the only opportunity they have to play outdoors in a safe environment, where they can learn to assess risks. Therefore it is imperative that we have a large amount of high quality resources that the children can access. The resources have allowed the children to gain an understanding of nature. In addition, our learners have improved their overall physical development e.g. developing balance, coordination and spatial awareness.’

Achray Farm – native hedge and tree planting

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This grant contributed towards panting of 200 metres of native hedge and 60 native trees beside the Black Water Special Area of Conservation at Achray farm, Brig O Turk.  Tree planting will improve connectivity by joining up areas of fragmented woodland. The planting scheme will enhance the landscape for local residents and the many visitors who pass through the farm on The Great Trossachs Path or The Three Loch’s Forest Drive. The project also included the removal of invasive non-native rhododendron ponticum within existing woodland on the farm.  The planting was carried out by young people from the 30th Glasgow Scout Group.  £5,410 grant awarded.

 

Younger Hall, Kilmun – restoration of original windows

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Younger Hall is a Category C Listed Building, dating from 1908, and designed in the Arts & Crafts Style.  It has a unique character and interest in the area and provides a central focus for the community – currently used for community council meetings, indoor games and local hobby and craft groups.  It is also the designated polling and emergency centre for the Cowal shore communities of the Park.

Currently, the leaded windows have numerous missing and damaged glass panels, some having previously been altered using standard glazing.  The Award Grant (£4693) supports the original windows being restored to their original appearance using best practice techniques.  Repair and maintenance of the building would enhance its role and increase its scope for expanding its use as a venue for the community and potentially wider public.

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